CURRV Workshops & Trainings

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This workshop and training series was designed to generate input from  stakeholders on the development of  climate adaptation strategies for the Tijuana River Valley, while simultaneously helping to build a broad regional understanding regarding climate change, resilience, and adaptation among regional decision-makers.

 

Gathering Stakeholder Input

Adaptation Planning Working Groups

February 2016 – Present

Each working group is charged with identifying and recommending specific adaptation strategies to be integrated into the Reserve’s Comprehensive Management Plan 2016 Update. The working groups are currently working to refine strategies and develop performance indicators for each strategy.  Working group focal areas include:

  • Cultural & Historical Resources
  • Education, Community Outreach, & Visitor Services
  • Public Access & Recreation
  • Research
  • Restoration, Stewardship, & Wildlife
  • Training

Successful Adaptation & the Tijuana River Valley

August 27, 2015 | Agenda

An interactive discussion in pursuit of the following objectives:

  • Begin to collaboratively develop a vision and goals for successfully adapting to climate change in the TRV, while exploring what successful adaptation looks like on-the-ground
  • Learn about techniques for and examples of measuring “successful adaptation” through development of indicators/metrics
  • Consider what indicators/metrics can be used to measure and propel us toward climate resiliency

Presentations:

Built Environment Vulnerability Assessment

Expert Interview Series

August 2014 – February 2015

During these interviews, participants are conducting a qualitative vulnerability assessment of the non-natural assets in the Tijuana River Valley.  Throughout the one-on-one conversations a comprehensive understanding of what climate and environmental changes the public agencies that own and manage land in the River Valley are proactively planning for in an attempt to collaboratively maintain and enhance local resilience.  The management sectors that are being explored during theses interviews include: cultural and historical resources; parks, recreation, and public access; agriculture; navy; border patrol; stormwater management and flood control; wastewater management; and transportation.  The results of these interviews will be compiled alongside the results of the Scenario Planning Expert Workshop and the Natural Habitat Vulnerability Assessment Expert Workshop to provide a comprehensive understanding of future vulnerabilities.

Natural Habitat Vulnerability Assessment

Expert Workshop

June 2, 2014 | Agenda | Summary of Vulnerabilities

During this workshop, biologists, ecologists, and land-use managers conducted a qualitative vulnerability assessment, partaking in a day-long discussion about the primary habitats throughout the river valley, and their potential vulnerability in each of the four scenarios identified in the Scenario Planning Expert Workshop.  This workshop will result in a report outlining the future vulnerabilities of the TRV’s natural habitats (coming soon!).

Scenario Planning Expert Workshop

December 16, 2013 | Agenda | Scenarios Report

Coastal geomorphologists, engineers, oceanographers, land use managers, and ecologists were convened to delve into how climate change might alter the physical landscape of the Tijuana River Valley.  The workshop resulted in a report outlining four potential futures, addressing changes in tidal prism and extreme river flow events.  The results from this workshop will feed directly into the CURRV climate vulnerability assessment.

Hosted as part of the Temporal Investigations of Marsh Ecosystems (TIME) project and facilitated by the Center for Collaborative Policy.

Stakeholder Kick- Off Workshop

April 16, 2013 | Agenda

Meeting objectives included: 1) Providing foundational information on climate change and adaptation processes, and how it translates to CURRV.  2) Establishing a collective understanding of existing conditions in the river valley and vulnerability assessments.

 Presentations:
Exercises:

Click here for photos.

 

 

Building Regional Capacity

Strategic Framing of Climate Change Conversations

June 15, 2016 | Workshop Materials

Based on the framework and techniques developed as part of the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI) project, participants learned how to use “strategic framing” to tell a story about climate change that can help communicators to engage audiences in positive ways.  Attendees learned how to use framing elements including tone, values, metaphors, and solutions.

Hosted in partnership with Sea Life Aquarium and the Climate Science Alliance- South Coast.

Climate Change Adaptation Planning for Tribal Nations

June 7-8, 2016

This 3-day course provided an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course was intended for tribal environmental and natural resource professionals, with a specific focus on tribes in the Southwest. Topics covered include: (1) Overview of climate change and impacts in the region; (2) Process of developing climate change adaptation plans, from getting started, to impact and vulnerability assessments, to developing adaptation strategies; and (3) Tools, resources and partnerships for adaptation planning.

Hosted in partnership with the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals- Northern Arizona University, Pala Band of Mission Indians, and the Climate Science Alliance- South Coast.

Climate – Smart Conservation training

June 2 & 3, 2016

This one day overview class was based on the guide Climate-Smart Conservation: Putting Adaptation Principles into Practice. The course provided an introduction to climate adaptation for application to on-the-ground conservation. It provided an overview of how to craft climate-informed conservation goals, to carry out adaptation with intentionality, and how to manage for change and not just persistence.   The course was offered at two separate locations on back-to-back days at the California Department of Fish & Wildlife offices in San Diego and Los Alamitos.

Hosted in partnership with the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) and the Climate Science Alliance- South Coast.

 Understanding the Coastal Commission’s Sea Level Rise Guidance

March 29, 2016 | Workshop Resources

In the morning session, participants learned about current sea level rise efforts occurring across San Diego County; and the Coastal Commission’s updated Sea Level Rise Guidance and how it can be applied to local planning and decision-making.  In the afternoon session, participants learned more about approaches for long-term sea level rise planning (e.g., trigger approach), and partook in interactive discussions that explored how phased approaches to SLR planning can be incorporated into local goals and planning processes.

Developed in partnership with the California Coastal Commission and the San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative.

Planning for Sea Level Rise using the New Coastal Storm Model

November 18, 2015 | Workshop Resources

Introductory overview of the new USGS Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) for the South Coast.  Participants learned: (1) what the San Diego region is doing to prepare for sea level rise; (2) what the CoSMoS model is; and (3) how CoSMoS can inform local planning.

Developed in partnership with USC Sea Grant, USGS, and the San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative.

Climate – Smart Conservation training

November 6, 2015 | Flyer

This one day overview class was based on the guide Climate-Smart Conservation: Putting Adaptation Principles into Practice. The course provided an introduction to climate adaptation for application to on-the-ground conservation. It provided an overview of how to craft climate-informed conservation goals, to carry out adaptation with intentionality, and how to manage for change and not just persistence.

Hosted in partnership with the National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) and the Climate Science Alliance- South Coast.

Introducing Green Infrastructure:

Approaches to Prepare for San Diego’s Changing Climate

April 29, 2015 | Agenda

Presentations & Resources | Summary Report

During this full-day introductory training, participants learned fundamental green infrastructure concepts and practices that can play a critical role in making our communities more resilient to a changing climate. Through presentations by local practitioners and group discussions, participants learned about local projects designed to address stormwater through green infrastructure strategies, and ways in which these projects can meet both water quality and other community goals.  Participants were introduced to:

  • Green infrastructure terms, concepts, and practices
  • Ecological, economic, and societal benefits of green infrastructure
  • Using green infrastructure to prepare for a changing climate
  • A wide variety of contexts and scales for implementation of green infrastructure projects
  • Innovative resources for implementing green infrastructure

Developed in partnership with the San Diego Regional Climate Collaborative and NOAA Office for Coastal Management.

One Watershed, One Future: Preparing for Climate Change

March 10, 2015 | Agenda |

Presentations & Resources (English, Spanish)

A binational exchange of information and ideas regarding conservation of the Tijuana River Watershed along the US-Mexico border, with a focus on climate change.  Participants will:

  • Become familiar with the National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS), specifically the Tijuana River NERR (TRNERR) and its efforts on climate change adaptation
  • Learn about the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative (CA LCC) and the San Diego Climate Science Alliance, and explore opportunities for future collaboration
  • Better understand regional climate change impacts, and climate-smart approaches for preparing our communities for the future
  • Build skills in assessing vulnerabilities to climate change, and evaluating adaptation strategies

Developed in partnership with the California Landscape Conservation Cooperative, California Department of Fish & Wildlife, and California State Parks.

 Orange County Regional Sea Level Rise &

Coastal Impacts Outreach Workshop

February 23, 2015 | Agenda

This training facilitated a regional discussion around planning for sea level rise in light of new science, policy guidelines, and management approaches.  Participants gained new skills as the following objectives were met:

  • Provide information about USGS’s Coastal Storms Modeling System and how it relates to other regional sea level rise models & tools
  • Discuss current initiatives in the region and opportunities for collaboration
  • Provide training on vulnerability assessments and adaptive management in planning for sea level rise impacts
  • Encourage networking with municipalities & regional partners and share information about ongoing sea level rise planning efforts in Orange County

Developed in partnership with USC Sea Grant, the FloodRISE project at the University of California, Irvine, the County of Orange, and the California Coastal Conservancy.

Planning & Facilitating Stakeholder Meetings

February 10 & 11, 2015

Planning and facilitating multiple stakeholder processes, such as Climate Action Planning, can be complicated, requiring a systematic approach. This course provided the skills and tools to design and implement collaborative approaches to balance various stakeholder interests.

After completing this course, participants are able to:

  • Design meetings that enhance problem solving and minimize conflict
  • Practice facilitation skills
  • Use appropriate process tools and techniques to address the meeting objectives
  • Manage conflict in meetings by understanding group dynamics
  • Identify disruptive behaviors in group processes and practice strategies to deal with them

The course was taught by NOAA Coastal Services Center’s expert training staff.  Hosted in partnership with the San Diego Climate Collaborative,

San Diego Regional Sea Level Rise &

Coastal Impacts Outreach Workshop

October 30, 2014 | Agenda

This training facilitated a regional discussion around planning for sea level rise in light of new science, policy guidelines, and management approaches.  Participants gained new skills as the following objectives were met:

  • Provide information about USGS’s Coastal Storms Modeling System and how it relates to other regional sea level rise models & tools
  • Discuss the regulatory and policy frameworks relevant to sea level rise
  • Provide training on “adaptive management” and the range of adaptation strategies available to a community
  • Encourage networking with municipalities & regional partners and share information about ongoing sea level rise planning efforts in San Diego

Developed in partnership with USC Sea Grant, San Diego Climate Collaborative, The San Diego Foundation, & the California Coastal Conservancy.

Lifting the Fog: Bringing Clarity to Sea Level Rise and Shoreline Change Models and Tools Project

Over the past several years in California, new tools, models, and guidance have been developed to address the impacts of coastal climate change. These resources are primarily targeted at the local coastal decision-makers who are on the front lines of sea level rise and storm surge impacts, and must prepare their communities for the future. To help local decision-makers use these new resources, a coalition of public, private, and non-profit organizations collaborated to provide practical support for coastal climate change adaptation planning practitioners. This effort, called “Lifting the Fog”, took place in 2014 through a series of facilitated dialogues, trainings, and collaborative product development.

Developed in partnership with NOAA Office for Coastal Management, San Francisco Bay NERR, Gulf of Farollones National Marine Sanctuary, Coravai, and The Nature Conservancy.

Climate Adaptation for Coastal Communities

October 1 – 3, 2013 | Flyer | Agenda

This intensive and highly interactive three-day training course provided individuals with a climate adaptation toolkit to proactively address adaptation planning in the context of local priorities. The course was taught by NOAA Coastal Services Center’s expert training staff and local partners. After completing this course, participants were able to:

  • Recognize the changes and variability in climate, and its influence on coastal communities
  • Examine methods for conducting hazard, vulnerability, and risk assessment as it relates to climate change
  • Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of adaptation strategies
  • Communicate effectively with target audiences
  • Identify opportunities to leverage a range of governance mechanisms to integrate adaptation strategies into existing efforts

Hosted in partnership with the San Diego Climate Collaborative.

Beyond Bathtub:

Modeling & Responding to Sea Level Rise and Shoreline Change

December 19, 2012 |  Agenda | Summary Report

This workshop was designed to help local city planners and environmental managers better understand sea level rise and shoreline change modeling.  The workshop allowed scientists to hear from planners/ managers about management needs and tool utility to inform future research and modeling efforts. Likewise, planners/ managers heard from scientists about the state-of-the science regarding climate change modeling and application constraints. The workshop served as a venue for this bi-directional information transfer to occur.  Click here to access workshop presentations.

Developed in partnership with California Ocean Protection Council, University of Southern California Sea Grant, and West Coast Governors Alliance on Ocean Health.