Border Field State Park: Divided Together App is LIVE on Apple and Google! The Podcast series has been launched!

The Border Field State Park: Divided Together app is live on Apple and Google. The app is a self-guided tour with highlights of the Divided Together podcast and is meant for high school age and up. There are currently three stops to the tour, with more coming: Kumeyaay Nation Divided by the Border, Indigenous Land Use Practices, and Scientists and Geographers Working Across Borders. Divided Together is brought to you by California State Parks Foundation, Parks California, and an anonymous donor; with support from the Friends of San Diego Wildlife Refuges.

Each stop is geopositioned around the turf on Monument Mesa. It has text, quotes, and an audio excerpt from the podcast. 

You can find the app on Apple or Google by searching for “Border Field State Park.” Before you come to the Park, it is recommended that you download the app, then download the tour (1 MB). If not, you can download the app closer to the entrance of the park, where there is better service. We recommend this because the service can be spotty on Monument Mesa.

Alternatively, you can also use the web app https://borderfieldsp.stqry.app from any device that has access to the internet.

Divided Together Podcast

Episode 4: Human Rights Along the Border

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Photo of Pedro Rios
Pedro Rios Director of the U.S. Border Program of the American Friends Service Committee. Photo credit: Gustavo Mayoral

This is the ancestral land of the First People, the Kumeyaay.

In 1917 during World War I, there was concern among Quakers- a largely religious group of people – to find ways to serve without joining the military or taking lives.

The American Friends Service Committee quickly established itself as an organization for humanitarian relief and social change. They were also in direct contact with the U.S. military discussing how to move forward with conscientious or religious objectors to war. This was in direct response to the military’s inconsistency in dealing with religious objectors during previous periods of conflict.

Over time, the American Friends Service Committee’s reputation grew. In 1947, they were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and since then have worked with groups from all backgrounds and cultures around the world to promote a world free of violence, inequality, and oppression. Here in the Southern California border region, this work largely focuses on immigration and humanitarian concerns.

In this episode we’ll hear how the American Friends Service Committee has had an impact on the border region and the lives of those involved in the work they do.

Divided Together is a California State Parks podcast series for Border Field State Park, brought to you by California State Parks Foundation, Parks California, and the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Music Credits:

Episode 3: Indigenous Land Use Practices

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This is the ancestral land of the First People, the Kumeyaay.

As climate change continues to wreak more havoc both locally and abroad, how we manage land will become more of a significant factor in protecting the planet’s resources. However, here in California, we don’t have to look far to find ways to accomplish that. 

For thousands of years, the Kumeyaay have implemented land management practices to both protect and enhance resources and productivity of the land, whether it’s for food or medicine or other raw materials. To this day, some of those traditional practices are still in use. This ranges anywhere from building rock walls to utilizing controlled burns.

In this episode of Divided Together, we’ll hear from two members of the Kumeyaay Nation and how their ancestors have used the land’s resources to benefit both the land and the people, as well as why these practices are necessary in our increasingly changing climate.

This episode closes with a special twenty-seven-year-old recording of the late San Jose de la Zorra elder, Gloria Castaneda, describing the juncus collecting song. Audio courtesy her daughter, Ana Gloria Rodriguez.

Divided Together is a California State Parks podcast series for Border Field State Park, brought to you by California State Parks Foundation, Parks California, and the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Photo: Kristie Orosco, San Pasqual Band of Diegueno Mission Indians; Mike Connolly, Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians.

Photo Credit: Gustavo Mayoral

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Episode 2: Scientists and Geographers Working Across Borders

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photo of 4 scientists and geographers

Photos: (left to right)- Dr. Jeff Crooks, TRNERR Research Coordinator; Dr. Julio Lorda, UABC; Dr. Trent Biggs, SDSU; Dr. Napoleon Gudino, UABC. Photo credit: Gustavo Mayoral 

This is the ancestral land of the First People, the Kumeyaay. 

In 1982, the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve was established. Its goal was, and still is, to enhance scientific collaboration and research within the watershed that is split between two countries, Mexico and the United States. Three quarters of this massive water basin lies in Mexico, making this collaboration even more necessary and important. 

Over time, various research partnerships were created to study erosion, sedimentation, and tropicalization. More recently, geography professors have studied erosion and sedimentation in Los Laureles Canyon in Tijuana, a sub-watershed that flows right into Border Field State Park. When it comes to the ocean, tropicalization is another significant collaboration topic. 

In this episode we’ll hear from some of the geographers and scientists working back and forth across the border, some of the challenges and rewards they’ve encountered, and ways to make studying this landscape and marine environment more accessible.

Divided Together is a California State Parks podcast series for Border Field State Park, brought to you by California State Parks Foundation, Parks California, and the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Photos: (top to bottom)- Dr. Jeff Crooks, TRNERR Research Coordinator; Dr. Julio Lorda, UABC; Dr. Trent Biggs, SDSU; Dr. Napoleon Gudino, UABC.

Photo credit: Gustavo Mayoral

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Episode 1: Kumeyaay Nation Divided by the Border

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Ana Gloria Rodriguez, Kumeyaay from San Jose de la Zorra, Mexico from the “Kumeyaay Nation Divided by the Border” episode.

This is the ancestral land of the First People, the Kumeyaay. 

When the border between the United States and Mexico was established in the 1850s, the land of the Kumeyaay was split between the new American state of California and northern Mexico. People and culture were immediately divided. In the over 170 years since, the effects on the culture and land management have become evident.

In this first episode of Divided Together, we’ll hear from a respected member of the Kumeyaay Nation, Ana Gloria “Martha” Rodriguez. For nearly 20 years, Martha and her family have been important stakeholders for California State Parks in San Diego County, often sharing cultural knowledge and providing invaluable feedback on proposed projects. She and her husband, Dr. Stanley Rodriguez, participated in our Fiesta del Rio event for ten years. They both run the Kosay Kumeyaay Market in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park. We’ll hear how this border has had an impact on the people and the land over the centuries, and we’ll hear what Martha is doing to help prevent further erosion and maintain the Kumeyaay way of life and spirit.

Divided Together is a California State Parks podcast series for Border Field State Park, brought to you by California State Parks Foundation, Parks California, and the generosity of an anonymous donor.

Photo credit: Gustavo Mayoral

Music Credits: